Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10201/73861

Title: "They don't have a name for what he is": the strategic de characterization of J. Demme’s Hannibal Lecter
Issue Date: 2019
Publisher: Servicio de Publicaciones, Universidad de Murcia
ISSN: 1989-6131
Related subjects: CDU::8- Lingüística y literatura
Keywords: Hannibal Lecter
Psychonarratology
Characterization
Phenomenology
Unknowability
Realism
Abstract: This essay challenges the myth of Hannibal Lecter, in Demme’s The Silence of the Lambs, as an enigmatic and unclassifiable character. Lecter’s enigma is generated through a largely unexplored process of de-characterization, i.e. by recurrently presenting him through the speech of other characters who describe him as unknowable. After considering Lecter’s case against the background of well-known literary unknowabilities, a deductive phenomenological exploration of Lecter’s de-characterization is carried out with the assistance of tools from the disciplines of personality and social psychology, and supported by empirical evidence from those fields. The demystifying of Lecter’s unreadability does not entail a debasement of the film or the character. On the contrary, Lecter’s de-characterization, albeit a form of narrative manipulation, is viewed as responsible for much of the film’s impact and success. It produces sensitivity-boosting effects; it mediates the indirect characterization of the other characters; and it engages the spectators’ self-image thus contributing importantly to the enjoyment and appreciation of the film.
Primary author: Cámara Arenas, Enrique
Collection: Vol.19 (1), 2019
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10201/73861
Document type: info:eu-repo/semantics/article
Number of pages / Extensions: 19
Rights: info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International
Appears in Collections:Vol.19 (1), 2019

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