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dc.contributor.authorBaltazar, Fátima-
dc.contributor.authorPinheiro, C.-
dc.contributor.authorMorais-Santos, F.-
dc.contributor.authorAzevedo-Silva, J.-
dc.contributor.authorQueirós, O.-
dc.contributor.authorPreto, A.-
dc.contributor.authorCasal, M.-
dc.date.accessioned2019-12-17T19:39:31Z-
dc.date.available2019-12-17T19:39:31Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationHistology and Histopathology, Vol. 29, n.º 12 (2014)es_ES
dc.identifier.issn0213-3911-
dc.identifier.issn1699-5848-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10201/84807-
dc.description.abstractMonocarboxylate transporters (MCTs) belong to a family of transporters, encoded by the SLC16 gene family, which is presently composed by 14 members, but only MCT1 to 4 have been biochemically characterized. They have important functions in healthy tissues, being involved in the transmembrane transport of lactic acid and other monocarboxylic acids in human cells. One of the recently recognized hallmarks of cancer is altered metabolism, with high rates of glucose consumption and consequent lactate production. To maintain this metabolic phenotype, cancer cells upregulate a series of plasma membrane proteins, including MCTs. MCT1 and MCT4, in particular, play a dual role in the maintenance of the metabolic phenotype of tumour cells. On one hand, they facilitate the efflux of lactate and, on the other hand, they contribute to the preservation of the intracellular pH, by co-transporting a proton. Thus, MCTs are attractive targets in cancer therapy, especially in cancers with a hyper-glycolytic and acid-resistant phenotype. Also recent evidence demonstrates that MCTs are involved in cancer cell uptake of chemotherapeutic agents, including 3-bromopyruvate. In this way, MCTs can act as “Trojan horses”, as their elevated expression in cancer cells can mediate the entry of this chemotherapeutic agent into the cells and selectively kill cancer cells. As a result, MCTs will be mediators of chemotherapeutic response, and their expression can be used as a molecular marker to predict response to chemotherapy.es_ES
dc.formatapplication/pdfes_ES
dc.format.extent14es_ES
dc.languageenges_ES
dc.publisherF. Hernández y Juan F. Madrid. Universidad de Murcia: Departamento de Biología Celular e Histologíaes_ES
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccesses_ES
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectMonocarboxylate transporterses_ES
dc.subjectCancer therapyes_ES
dc.subjectGlycolysises_ES
dc.subjectMolecular targetses_ES
dc.subject.otherCDU::5 - Ciencias puras y naturales::57 - Biología::576 - Biología celular y subcelular. Citologíaes_ES
dc.titleMonocarboxylate transporters as targets and mediators in cancer therapy responsees_ES
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articlees_ES
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.14670/HH-29.1511-
Aparece en las colecciones:Vol.29, nº12 (2014)

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